Archive | August, 2005

Katrina and The Mississippi

New Orleans in the southern US has been devastated by Hurricane Katrina. According to tonights ABC television news, 80% of the city is under water. I was in Louisiana in February 1999 and remember enjoying a meal of crawfish in Baton Rouge (just north of New Orleans) and hearing about Hurricane Betsy in 1965 and […]

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Why Did Sugar Kill My Plants?

I am currently studying biology in Grade 11 at High School. I grew Brassica rapa from seed with a control of just tap water and two treatments with different sugar solutions under 24 hour light. The control plants (no sugar) flourished and grew to a height of 10.5 cm over 4 weeks. However, the plants […]

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Herd Behaviour

Hi Jennifer I’ve read an interesting article, written in 1989, about ‘herd behaviour’. You are probably aware of the piece anyway, but just in case I thought I’d mention it. Here’s a section that looks like it relates to current controveries, even though it largely predates it: Suppose you have some curve between the extreme […]

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To Burn or Graze

There has been a bit written at this site about the importance of burning landscapes including comment from David Ward in WA that: “I have recently developed geometric evidence that frequent burning is the only (repeat only), way to maintain a reasonably fine grained fire mosaic, with small, mild, and controllable fires; a rich diversity […]

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Greenpeace Accounts for 2004

I was surprised to read The Melbourne’s Age newspaper describe Greenpeace as an ‘eco-fascist concern': Multinational stunt outfit Greenpeace Australia Pacific saw its supporter base decline and fund- raising costs blow out in calendar 2004. Accounts just to hand for the eco- fascist concern show that a bigger slice of its fund-raising efforts was swallowed […]

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On Government Departments

“The trouble, at least on the surface, seems that any government department would rather spend a dollar on simulation than a dime on in-service testing, and the simulation frequently misses vital points while stressing irrelevancies.” … from a reader of this web-blog

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Cubbie Hole

Paul Sheehan writing in today’s Sydney Morning Herald blames the Queensland National Party for Cubbie Station and the water it holes up. Water that goes to grow cotton in Queensland instead of sheep in NSW. Sheehan writes: “The Sinkhole, for example, breaks every rule of communal morality. It is better known as Cubbie Station, and […]

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The Price of Woodchip

On Saturday I attended a conference at the State Library of New South Wales sponsored by the Independent Scholars Association of Australia, NSW Chapter, entitled “Looking for Forests, Seeing Trees: A Continent at Risk”. Senator Bob Brown of the Australian Greens was the keynote speaker. It soon became apparent that many of Sydney’s ‘Independent Scholars’ […]

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Glaciers Surveyed, Article Reviewed

Phillip Done, a reader of this web-log, reviews a recent article in New Scientist: “The 27 August 2005 New Scientist (NS) has an article Global Warming: The flaw in the thaw. It examines recent developments in worldwide glacial retreat. 79 out of 88 glaciers surveyed were retreating. The phenomenon of glacial meltdown is heralded by […]

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Organic Food Crisis – Problems with Paper Trail

According to the Britian’s Observer newspaper: Britain’s organic food revolution was facing its first serious test last night after an Observer investigation revealed disturbing levels of fraud within the industry. Farmers, retailers and food inspectors have disclosed a catalogue of malpractice, including producers falsely passing off food as organic and retailers failing to gain accreditation […]

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