Historically, alcohol thermometers were used to measure minimum temperatures, and mercury thermometers were used to measure maximum temperatures - across Australia.  Then on 1 November 1996, the Bureau changed their 'primary instrument' to electronic sensors.

A Law Unto Themselves: The Australian Bureau of Meteorology

Sunday, 12th November 2017 – 4PM Honourable Josh Frydenberg MP Minister for Environment and Energy Dear Minister Re: Suspend announcement of new record hot days – Inform WMO that Bureau’s measurements are currently not comparable with mercury thermometers – Give directive for release of more A8 forms – Establish an audit mechanism 1. BACKGROUND I […]

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Scroll to the end of this post to download the entire spreadsheet with all 60 numbers for each worked example.

Averaging by Convention – or Not

FOR some time, weather enthusiasts across Australia have been noticing rapid temperature fluctuations at the ‘latest observations’ page at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s website. For example, Peter Cornish, a retired hydrologist, wrote to the Bureau on 17 December 2012 asking whether the 1.5 degrees Celsius drop in temperature in the space of one minute […]

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Before the advent of irrigation the Murray river would run dry during periods of extended drought.  These were exceptionally hot years in the Murray Darling Basin.

Faux Record Hot Days, Including at Mildura

Alan Jones AO Radio 2GB, Sydney Dear Alan, This spring has begun with the Bureau of Meteorology announcing a new ‘hottest September day on record’ almost every other day. Last Saturday, for example, we heard that it was the hottest September day in Mildura since 1889. Really? Hotter than 1905 or even 1938 – those […]

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Jennifer Marohasy and Lance Pidgeon at the Goulburn AWS in early August 2017.

Bureau Management Rewrites the Rules – Again

Following is the latest advice from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology regarding measurement of temperatures from automatic weather stations (AWS). This advice contains numerous errors of fact and is inconsistent with the information in an internal review issued just last Thursday. The following misinformation has just been posted at the official Bureau website: http://www.bom.gov.au/inside/AWS_Review_Fast_Facts.pdf My […]

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John Abbot standing in front of the Noosa River, Queensland - not far from the Climate Lab where he works on rainfall forecasting using artificial neural networks.

John has Plus 10 Degrees, Bureau Loses Minus 10 Degrees

He studied chemistry at Imperial College, London, has 10 degrees, including a law degree, and has published more than 100 scientific papers. I’m referring to my husband, John Abbot. He is also a man of few words. Last Friday morning, after flipping through the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s latest 77-page internal report – Review of […]

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The value of minus 10.4 marked with a red asterisk is the lowest one second measurement for the previous 60 seconds to 6.17am on 2 July 2017 at Goulburn airport.  This one second reading was initially rounded-up up to -10.0, but after some protesting was recorded in the ADAM database as the minimum for Goulburn airport for that day - and a new record for July.

Vindicated: Bureau not following WMO guidelines

TWO decades ago the Australian Bureau of Meteorology replaced most of the manually-read mercury thermometers in its weather stations with electronic probes that could be read automatically – so since at least 1997 most of the temperature data has been collected by automatic weather stations (AWS). Before this happened there was extensive testing of the […]

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Thredbo-BarChartV3

Vindicated: Bureau acknowledges limits set on how cold temperatures can be recorded

THE Bureau has a network of 695 automatic weather stations (AWS) across Australia. In a report released late yesterday it acknowledged issues with the performance of just two of these: Goulburn Airport (Goulburn) and Thredbo Top Station (Thredbo). These are the same two weather stations that I reported at my blog were not recording temperatures […]

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The electronic probes and liquid-in-glass thermometers are housed in the white box (the Stevenson screen) in the foreground of this picture of Wilsons Promontory lighthouse.  It is unfortunate that solar panels have been installed such that they are facing the box with the thermometers - I have complained about this in previous correspondence.  This photograph was taken by Daynaa (daynaa2000.wordpress.com) with permission to republished requested in 2015.

Are Recordings from Electronic Devices Comparable – or Not?

Because a change in equipment can potentially create discontinuities in a temperature record, it is Australian Bureau of Meteorology policy to have new equipment recording side-by-side with old equipment for a period of at least 2 years. In this way, readings from the new equipment can be compared with readings from the old equipment, including […]

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Jen Marohasy at the Goulburn weather station where the Bureau acknowledges it set a limit of minus 10 degrees on how cold a temperature could be recorded this winter, never mind that this  AWS recorded minus 10.9 degrees Celsius during a previous winter.

Two Decades of Temperature Data from Australia – Not Fit for Purpose

Australia is a large continent in the Southern Hemisphere. The temperatures measured and recorded by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology contribute to the calculation of global averages. These values, of course, suggest catastrophic human-caused global warming. Two decades ago the Bureau replaced most of the manually-read mercury thermometers in its weather stations with electronic devices […]

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Peter Ridd, Professor of Physics, James Cook University, Townsville

Concerned About Prof Peter Ridd

I have been chatting off-and-on with Peter Ridd, now Professor of Physics at James Cook University, for nearly two decades. We both resent the lack of honesty in the reporting of many environmental issues. Earlier this week, Prof Ridd was concerned that his recent comments to Sid Maher at The Australian newspaper [1], and then […]

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